Mission Study

"Who Do We Say That Jesus Is in Namibia, Africa?"

Rev. Nangula E. Kathindi, CGMB Overseas Partner - Africa

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Who do we say Jesus is today in East Asia and the Pacific?

Xiaoling Zhu, Executive for East Asia and the Pacific

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This is the Day That the Lord has Made...

By David A. Vargas
Common Global Ministries Board
April 15, 2004

My dear brothers and sisters in the family of our Redeemer, Jesus the Christ: "today, ...yes, today is still the day that the Lord has made," and no matter the difficult situations that we may encountering or the tough decisions we may have to make, "let us" not forget to " rejoice and be glad in it." (Psalm 118:24)

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Who do you/we say Jesus is today in the Middle East and Europe

Peter Makari, Executive for Middle East and Europe

During the promotion of his film, "The Passion of Christ," Mel Gibson said that it is not his job to respond to the question of why Jesus was crucified. Rather, in making his controversial and famously popular film, Gibson's passion seems to have been to answer the question of "how." Financial issues aside–and wouldn't it be nice if Global Ministries were to receive just one weekend's box office profits?–it is our passion to answer the question of "why." The question of "why" is inextricably linked to the question that Jesus asked his disciples, our theme adapted for this meeting: "Who do we say that Jesus is today ?" The "who" and the "why" go hand in hand as we consider Christ's suffering and resurrection, and the mission of the church.

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Where We Do Not Wish to Go

A prelude. Once upon a time there was a husband and a wife, both of whom worked. A few days before a summer holiday, let's say the Fourth of July, the husband's out-of-town family called to invite themselves for the up-coming holiday week-end. The husband immediately says yes, please come, we would love to have you. Now husband cooks only barbecue ribs. Not breakfast or lunch or potato salad or baked beans. Does not go grocery shopping and nor make up beds.

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Who Do You Say that Jesus is in Latin America and the Caribbean?

Executive for Latin America and the Caribbean

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Who Do People Say Jesus Is? -- India

By Dhyanchand Carr, CGMB Overseas Partner - India

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Whom Do You Say Jesus Is Today? -- An African Perspective

Bonganjalo Goba, Executive for Africa

Christ enough to break all barriers;
Christ enough in peace, in strife;
Christ enough to build our nation;
Christ enough for death, for life;
Christ enough for old and lonely;
Christ enough for those who fall; 
Christ enough to save the sin-sick; and
Christ enough for one; for all."
(John B. Gardener)

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Who do people in Southern Asia say that Jesus is today?

I have slightly modified the title from ‘Who do we say Jesus is today in Southern Asia' to ‘Who do people of Southern Asia say Jesus is today?' I just wanted to make sure that our focus is on the understanding of people in different parts of the world about Jesus rather than ‘we' trying to define it for them.

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The Challenge of Mission Action

The Challenge of Mission Action Click headline for full article. Click headline for full article. In the Spanish language that I learned since I was a child in Puerto Rico, there are two words that we utilize to translate what the word challenge means in English: sometimes, we use the word "reto"; but in some other instances, we use the word "desafío." Click headline for full article. If you check your Spanish/English dictionary, you will find that there is not really much difference in the definition of these two words, ... but in our daily use of these terms (at least in our Puerto Rican context) we have developed a distinction. Click headline for full article. It is true that both "reto" and "desafio" means challenge; that is, facing a situation that may demand our engagement in a contest or fight; a situation that may demand an explanation from us; or a situation that may demand or require total use of our abilities and resources. But a key difference between these two words in Spanish is that a "reto" is not the type of challenge that may involve a serious risk, threat, and great sacrifice, ... as may be the case with a "desafio". In other words, when we try to talk about challenges, it does not take us long to realize that, indeed, there are challenges and there are CHALLENGES. For a hen, for instance, to lay an egg means to face a situation which requires full use of her abilities and resources. For a hen, to lay an egg is certainly a challenge that I would describe in Spanish as a "reto". However, for a pig to produce bacon is much more that a "reto"; it is a challenge that demands a supreme sacrifice. Click headline for full article. If we examine the Scriptures carefully, especially Jesus’ message, we will notice that the Gospel is full of challenges, ... but also of CHALLENGES. "Come to me all who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest" (Matt. 11:28)... is a challenge , but it is the type of challenge that is just a "reto;" "Come, follow me and I will make you fishers of men (and women)" is a challenge that requires full use of our abilities and resources." (Matt. 4:19) ..., but one that is just a "reto." BUT to listen to Jesus saying, ... "You have heard that it was said, ‘eye for an eye, and tooth for tooth.’ but I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If someone strikes you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also ...," (Matt. 5:38) that is a "desafio," a challenge that requires ultimate sacrifice and transformation of who we are. Click headline for full article. When we hear Jesus responding to the rich ruler who asked Him what he had to do to inherit eternal life, "You still lack one thing. Sell everything you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me" (Matt 18:22), ... that, friends, is not a "reto." That is, in Spanish, a "D-E-S-A-F-I-O;" a challenge that requires a radical change in a person’s life. Click headline for full article. Yes, it is true that Jesus did confront the religious and political establishment of 2000 years ago with challenges, ... but also with CHALLENGES! And today, as we reflect on the realities of world, and the mission of Global Ministries in midst of those realities, we have to acknowledge, once again, that Jesus’ demands for our lives continue to entail not only challenges, ... but also CHALLENGES!

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