Work in Swaziland

We are pleased to report that due to the generosity of churches during Week of Compassion (Disciples churches) and Hour of Sharing (UCC churches), a rural NCP (Neighborhood Care Point) will be able to install a water pump to get potable water as needed from the bore hole they have drilled!

Greetings from the kingdom of Swaziland! We are pleased to report that due to the generosity of churches during Week of Compassion (Disciples churches) and Hour of Sharing (UCC churches), a rural NCP (Neighborhood Care Point) will be able to install a water pump to get potable water as needed from the bore hole they have drilled! At the very rural location of Mgundundlovu, they have a kitchen for feeding AIDS orphans and OVCs. They also have a small church that doubles as a preschool. When we visited them recently, we saw their small garden but were told that if they had water readily available, they would plant and grow many more crops. They would like to become self-sustaining by growing plenty of vegetables and selling any “extra” crops. We are excited to be a part of this project, knowing that when people in the U.S. open their hearts and their purses, Global Ministries helps organize and implement the necessary steps for projects like this that benefit so many people at once.

We are actively working on setting up a preschool at Kukhany"Okusha church in Manzini.  The church folks here feel the need for a Christian based preschool, so we had an inspector come to give us the steps we need to take in order to get a permit. We are also checking into the feasibility of internet theology classes here. The goal, I believe, is to get more people, especially females, better equipped to "minister" to friends and relatives who are ill or dying. This is especially important in a country which is now leads the world in cases of AIDS per capita.  Theology classes will help adults deepen their faith, while also equipping them as "counselors."

We have started siSwati lessons. People at church have taught us some greeting phrases, which are absolutely necessary in this culture. In Swaziland, someone asks, “How are you?” and waits to hear the answer.  The typical person politely shows respect for elders when greeting, and nearly always shakes your hand with both of his/ hers or sometimes even gives you a hug. As we learn the language, we learn more about the culture of this small kingdom. In siSwati, some words and phrases are not too hard, but we have to retrain our mouths when it comes to the clicks and pops. It always sounds nice when Swazis say them, but so far it sounds strange when we try the clicks and pops. It is our understanding that a language with many clicks and pops (like the San people) shows that those people were “hunters and gatherers” because such sounds occur in nature, and would not startle an animal being hunted.

Sending blessings to all our Christian brothers and sisters,

Terry and Diana Hutter serve as Long-term Volunteers with the Khukhan’Okusha Zion Church in Swaziland. They serve as coordinators of the development programs.